Home Interest Technique & Theory Why we DON'T teach steady blowing at the Dojo (and what we teach instead...) [Vintage]
Why we DON'T teach steady blowing at the Dojo (and what we teach instead...) [Vintage]

Why we DON'T teach steady blowing at the Dojo (and what we teach instead...) [Vintage]

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In this class, we have a look at the magical voodoo skill of blowing steadily that we all think is the secret to getting good tone. It isn't, of course! Instead, we need to learn to find our chanter reed's sweet spot. If we can consistently play at the sweet spot, steady blowing will be a natural bi-product. Tired of getting bugged by the Pipe Major? Watch this class.

Date of Original Live Class: Tuesday, April 30th, 2013 at 7:30am
Course Name: Technique Development
Class Name: Why we DON'T teach steady blowing at the Dojo (and what we teach instead...)
Class Instructor: Andrew Douglas

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Andrew Douglas Andrew is a prolific practitioner of the bagpipe, having been active at the highest level of pipe bands, solo competition, teaching, and creative endeavors for the past 20 years. He's also the founder and creator of Dojo U and of PipersDojo.com

Comment(2)

  1. Excellent explanation of what happens to the reed at different pressures. I'll be experimenting a bit with my reeds to understand them better. One thing though, I fail to be convinced that a manometer or pressure gauge is all that helpful in determining the location of your chanter reed's sweet spot. That pressure is just a number and will change depending on how long you've been torturing your chanter reed at the end of a practice session.

    Those gauges are kind of 'scientific' but in the end a piper who has progressed beyond the first year of piping, should be able to 'hear' when his or her chanter reed has reached its sweet spot. I can hear it ( just been messing with the pipes seriously for the last six months or so) and I don't feel that the pressure gauge is all that useful, apart from the one-off, "lets see what the actual pressure reading is when I blow into this thing". I have one, and have used it on a few occasions, but it really doesn't help me with listening to what my chanter reed is doing. In my opinion, and I'm far from being a luddite, get rid of the pressure gauge and start listening to your chanter reed and get close and personal with it 🙂

    1. Hi Dan - I pretty much agree with you! At the end of the day, a piper has to be able to get that sweet spot, all the time, on one's own. With that said, the visual is a great way to get started.

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