Home Patrick McLaurin

Patrick McLaurin

Patrick McLaurin
Patrick McLaurin has been playing the Great Highland Bagpipes and Scottish Smallpipes since 1996. He maintains a website for teaching, understanding, and promoting the art of highland piping (patrickmclaurin.com). According to his wife he has way too many bagpipes. When he’s not piping Patrick teaches chemistry at Texas Tech University.

Bagpipe Chanter Tuning—Part 3: Using a Chromatic Tuner

Patrick McLaurin 0
0
1.14K
In Part 2 of this series, we learned about the equal temperament scale used by non-bagpipe tuners and why it would produce a chanter scale at odds with the presence of drones. We will now learn how to create a chanter scale that will harmonize with the drones.

Bagpipe Chanter Tuning—Part 2: Equal Temperament vs. the Drones

Patrick McLaurin 0
0
1.11K
In Part 1 of this series, the foundation of the highland bagpipe scale was outlined in the context of staff notation. Out of a possible scale of 12 notes found in the chromatic scale: A Bb B C C# D Eb E F F# G G#, the highland bagpipe uses only 7: A B C# D E F# G, placing it square in the key of D-major. It is important to understand what the highland bagpipe scale is in relation to the more universal chromatic scale if the goal is to understand how to tune a highland bagpipe chanter using a standard chromatic, non-bagpipe tuner.

Bagpipe Chanter Tuning—Part 1: The Scale

Patrick McLaurin 0
0
2.01K
Many pipers will say, in jest, the best way to use a tuner is to throw it in the trash. The only reason you can do that is because the bagpipe has a built-in tuner—the drones.