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Admitting Your Mistakes

David Lairson
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When you fail at something, or make a mistake, or come in last place in a competition, it’s easy to want to hide from it. Nobody has to know about it. You can put it in a dark little corner in your mind that only you know about. You only want people to know about the things you do well. Right? The problem is that failure is a way to learn. If you don’t admit to the failure, you don’t learn the whole lesson.

Archie McNeill—The Blind Piper

"What Key is the Highland Bagpipe?"

Tom Crawford
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One of  the questions pipers are often asked is what "key" the bagpipes are in. Usually, you'll hear this from other musicians. And like most things bagpipe, the initial answer is "well, it's complicated . . ." That's because are several answers to the question “What key is the Highland bagpipe?” and the question needs to be taken in context.

"What Is a 'Dotted' Note All About?"

Visualizing ALAP/ASAP—Part 3

Mark Olson
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On the bagpipe, we cannot play a note with more volume in order to add expression to a phrase. Indeed, our goal is to play at a steady pressure so that the pitch of the chanter and the drones remains constant. Nor do we have techniques such as staccato or legato available to us on the Highland bagpipe. On the Highland bagpipe, we express our music by holding notes longer than we would normally hold them, playing them As Long As [Musically] Possible (ALAP) and playing contrasting notes As Short As [Musically] Possible (ASAP).

Archie McNeill—The Blind Piper

Visualizing ALAP/ASAP—Part 2

Mark Olson
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On the bagpipe, we cannot play a note with more volume in order to add expression to a phrase. Indeed, our goal is to play at a steady pressure so that the pitch of the chanter and the drones remains constant. Nor do we have techniques such as staccato or legato available to us on the Highland bagpipe. On the Highland bagpipe, we express our music by holding notes longer than we would normally hold them, playing them As Long As [Musically] Possible (ALAP) and playing contrasting notes As Short As [Musically] Possible (ASAP).

Archie McNeill—The Blind Piper

Visualizing ALAP/ASAP—Part 1

Mark Olson
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On the bagpipe, we cannot play a note with more volume in order to add expression to a phrase. Indeed, our goal is to play at a steady pressure so that the pitch of the chanter and the drones remains constant. Nor do we have techniques such as staccato or legato available to us on the Highland bagpipe. On the Highland bagpipe, we express our music by holding notes longer than we would normally hold them, playing them As Long As [Musically] Possible (ALAP) and playing contrasting notes As Short As [Musically] Possible (ASAP).

Archie McNeill—The Blind Piper

Patrick Mor MacCrimmon

David Lairson
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The MacCrimmon family, the Hereditary Pipers of Clan MacLeod, produced many great pipers and are credited with a tremendous historical influence on the art of piobaireachd. The most influential member of the family was Donald Mor MacCrimmon. Patrick Mor, one of Donald Mor’s sons, who followed his father as Hereditary Piper, was known as a great player and composer.

"What Is a D Throw?"